Nikki Sixx Blasts "Make Believe" Story About Mötley Crüe Firing Mick Mars

Mötley Crüe bassist Nikki Sixx says there's absolutely no truth to Jake E. Lee's story about being approached to replace Mick Mars in 1984.

The former Ozzy Osbourne guitarist Lee was recently asked for his recollections of what unfolded between Ozzy's band and Crüe during more than a year the two acts spent together on the 'Bark at the Moon' Tour.

In the same Tone-Talk interview in which Lee challenged Crüe's infamous story about Ozzy supposedly snorting a line of ants, he also recalled friction that developed during the tour between himself, Mötley Crüe and Mars.

Lee went so far as to say Sixx and Tommy Lee once approached him about replacing Mars in Mötley Crüe.

"You can understand that," Lee said. "F---ing better looking and f---ing better playing. They wanted me to replace Mick. Mick's in-law or whatever was funding the band, so that didn't happen."

Without naming Jake, Sixx responded via Twitter calling out the "has beens, never was's, washed up long ago small career people" for "coming outta the woodwork" since The Dirt was released in March.

God bless them," the bassist added. "They must be desperate."

 

When Jake's statement about Mars was brought up by a fan, Sixx responded more specifically to that claim.

"Make believe story," Sixx wrote. "Everybody wants [a piece] of the Crüe now. Believe me. Almost 40 years together. We know our story way more than some shadowy worms."

In Jake's defense, he's hardly come out of the woodwork. The legendary guitarist has been on the road or in the studio consistently in recent years and playing with his band Red Dragon Cartel since 2013. His second album with RDC came out last October.

Also, the 'Bark at the Moon' tour lasted a long time. A lot could have happened in the more than 130 concerts since the tour began and ended. If we learned one thing from The Dirt, it was that Crüe was capable of absolutely anything; the idea that members of the band briefly discussed adding Jake E. Lee is hardly a preposterous revelation, even if it may never have been serious.

Photo: Getty Images

 

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